Amy Robach Thought Her Arm Pain Was a Heart Problem, Says Anxiety Causes ‘Vicious Cycles of Fear’


“I just started freaking out,” he said.

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Amy Robach

Amy Robach details the terrifying moment he thought he was suffering from a heart problem after going for a run with TJ Holmes.

During the June 10 episode of his podcast. amy and tjfirst GMA3 The co-hosts shared that the “serious moment” occurred just hours before arriving at work. Robach, 51, said his anxiety has been “elevated” recently, which is one of the reasons he thought he was having a health problem.

“We had just gone for a run and I was perfectly fine. And about 30 minutes later my arm started burning and I felt numbness and it was actually painful and I felt like a surge and I had never felt that before,” she explained. “It lasted several minutes and I had to take a deep breath.”

“Since then I have had anxiety because my head is spinning,” he added.

Robach said she was nervous because she hasn’t had a heart problem since she was 38 and underwent surgery to treat a “dangerous arrhythmia.”

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TJ Holmes and Amy Robach

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“I started freaking out and thought, ‘Oh no, what if I have a heart problem?’ And I just haven’t been able to get rid of the anxiety,” she said, joking that she has “self-imposed heart palpitations.”

Both Robach and Holmes agreed that anyone who has had any type of health problem or battle tends to overreact.

“You come to the worst-case scenario because it happened once when you didn’t think it could happen,” he said. “Something that normally I would just laugh at, I suddenly think, ‘Now I feel a little dizzy, maybe I have a brain tumor.’ You get into these vicious cycles of fear and then eventually you have to talk yourself out of the abyss and exhale it.”

Holmes later admitted that although Robach feels better now, he was really scared throughout the entire ordeal.

“I had to be calm, but I was in absolute panic,” he said as Robach said he had no idea at the time. “I was taking off my running clothes and getting ready to go to the hospital.”

“We laugh about it now, but it was serious,” Holmes added.

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